Posts tagged mixing philosophy
My Pet Peeves in the Audio Industry

Everything you do can be utterly satisfying, if it excites, intrigues and fuels you. That one thing for me is audio. The entire field, from music creation and production, studio work, live sound mixing to just enjoying a great piece of music is something that fills me with joy and energy. But as with everything in life, it can never be just fun and games - there are always a few situations or moments that can slightly spoil your mood and get under your skin. Nothing drastic or severe, just more of a nuisance that rubs you the wrong way. Welcome to my current list.

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You might be guerrilla mixing, if …

From my own experience, and that of fellow engineers, this perfect world is about as common as a unicorn dancing on a pot of gold underneath a rainbow. In the real world we have the exact opposite - wrong or no information and everything needs to happen 5 minutes ago. Mixing in such an environment, where you are forced to react rather than prepare, is what I call “guerrilla mixing”. And chances are you are fighting the same petty warfare as well ...

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Less channels does not an easier mix make

“It is going to be an easy gig, we only have 3 vocal microphones and an acoustic guitar.” A sentence I’ve heard many times from PA providers who hired me to mix was surely meant to comfort me, but it had the exact opposite effect. Let me tell you why I still dread intimate acoustic events to this day and what techniques I have developed for dealing with them.

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Live Mixing Or Mastering?

The focus of live mixing for major shows turned from focusing on single channels to the master channel. Sure, you have to be a mixing engineer during the preproduction stages, and you might still go back and tweak some channels on various cues and snapshots during setup, but when show time comes, you are zeroed in on the master bus, mostly taking care of snapshots being fired at proper moments. From a studio point of view, you are not a mixing engineer anymore, you are tweaking the summed results of a mix - you are now a live mastering engineer.

 

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